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Autumn pruning – end of 2018 season – part II

Autumn pruning – end of 2018 season – part II

The previous post was entirely dedicated to the Carpinus species because I have many Carpinus trees in my collection and some are in very early stage of development, and are not yet published on the blog, others that already prove potential as you were able to see visiting my last article. However, my collection has a variety of species and as follows I will post pictures of their pruning process adding also some comments about decisions that I took.

The Wild Cherry below was collected in Autumn of 2017. It grew well in 2018 but it branched only on one side of the trunk. So, the solution was to prune and wire it to mimic the wind blown bonsai style. I left the branches at about 7-8 cm long to obtain ramification distant from the trunk to be able to continue this style. 

Another Wild Cherry with “elephant” style nebari. It grew some branches lower than expected. However, I left them longer to develop ramification. If in 2019 it will not bud for new branches from the main upper trunk, in Autumn of 2019 when pruning I will carve the trunk with an electric carver.

I found in the woods last year a nice slim, tall and feminine moved trunk Wild Cherry. I collected it and left it tall in order to create a literati style tree. It grew nicely long branches from the top that I have wired according to the style’s approach. I will cut back to two after bud-break in order to create dense ramification as pads on the tips of the structural branches.

Another fruiting tree is my Cornus Malus. It has a dead wood part in the middle of the trunk covered by live vein. In the future I will carve the deadwood to increase the character of the tree.

A multi-trunk Cotoneaster collected in fall of 2017. This tree had an awesome progression in 2018.

And a second Cotoneaster, this is more shohin style.

My best Fagus Sylvatica that is in between shohin and medium sized bonsai.

Last year I got a Pyracantha, about 2 m tall and potted in a very large container. I have repotted it and pruned drastically. It grew nice this year and now I pruned it for the first time to start it’s canopy.

A Linden tree that I love just because it keeps creating the branches exactly there I need them. This tree was collected in fall of 2017, and it was nearly parallel to the ground and I had to plant it vertically in order to have a correct position of the trunk. Using wires I already succeeded in creating the structural base of the tree. 

To have more flowering trees, I collected a Rambling Rose last year. This grew all 2018 season vigorously. I let it run in order to make sure it will gain a lot of strength to develop strong ramification in 2019. However, all my Rambling Rose trees will be kept over winter in the basement as these are highly susceptible to frost.  Using wires I have given drastic movement to the main branches. In spring I will remove the wires as the shape is already established.

The last tree I will post is an European Elm, collected by a friend of mine in spring of 2018. This as well grew vigorously all 2018 season. 

Hope these will inspire you in your future work.
Thanks for the visit,
M.

 

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part III

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part III

In order to continue presenting the newly collected material in Spring 2018, I will add new photos of several species of trees that I found suitable for bonsai and I found them with quite nice potential. Some of them have already a nice structure, others are only trunk lines that will developed to canopy in the following years. Because I considered that I do not have trees that flower or develop fruits, I have collected species that will do, as soon as they will get established in their new environment.

Some Prunus avium or wild cherry tree. I have collected several cherry tree trunks and they all leafed out by now, vigorously and very healthy.

Two Cotoneasters that were full of fruits during summer of 2017.

A Fagus, very nice ramification and trunk movement.

Some Gleditschia triacanthos with old looking bark on the trunk and nice branching.

A wild apple tree that just started pushing buds from old leaves.

A Pyracantha that was kept in a big flower pot and last year was full of fruits. By now the thick branch also pushed buds that are opening.

A Pyrus Pyraster, or wild pear. In fall, its leaves color turns to red right before dropping them. It gives a quite nice color spectacle as a bonsai.

A Linden that was wired into a feminine movement and seems like “she” is doing just perfect.

I have other several trees that were collected just this year but those need a bit more work to start their branching. Future progression based posts will include pictures about those as well.

Hope you find nice my new collection and thanks for the visit.
M.

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part II

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part II

So, as promised in my previous post I will follow-up with the new collected material in fall of 2017 and spring of 2018 as well. All these pictures were taken in early April 2018 and by now all their buds are swelling and many of these trees are already leafed out. I will present in a future post their progression as detailed as possible, but it takes me quite some time to shoot pictures of so many trees to follow their growth.

A Carpinus with elegant trunk movement.

A Carpinus in cascade style. It has a too long trunk for cascade style but it has an extremely well formed canopy for this. The trunk issue will be solved in 2019. If the tree will be vigorous through this year, in May 2019 I will airlayer it in order to obtain a shorter trunk with some possible nebari to get it ready for repotting in 2020 into a tall cascade dedicated ceramic pot.

One of my favorite from the collected material of 2018 is a raft Carpinus with aerial roots as well. It is an awesome tree and it needed a custom made wood container. It is about 1m long. It seems to be doing just good as at the moment of writing this post it is already in leaf.

Another semi-raft Crapinus that is by this time full of leafs and proving to be quite vigorous.

Still in the Carpinus selections, one with aerial roots.

Probably the last Carpinus that I will mention in this post, is one with very dense ramification and the size of the branching from thick to medium to thin being very fast in narrow distances from the trunk. I think that in order to obtain such ramification on demand it takes a lot of skills and maybe some luck as well.

As you probably observed, I collected quite some Carpinus yamadori. I am fascinated by the diversity of styles and changes that I found in yamadori style Carpinus. In my opinion, with this species you can either find or create in time any stile you want from the wide perspective of bonsai styles. Even now, as you can observe in my pictures, it is able to grow aerial roots that usually is common for ficus trees. Of course these so called aerial roots were under ground when the trees were collected, however their feeder roots are now under soil level while their wooden part was exposed to create the perspective of tropical aerial roots.

In future posts I will present other species as well, but I felt like dedicating Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part I and II only to Carpinus species.

Thanks for the visit,
M.

 

 

 

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part I

Yamadori – collected in Spring 2018 – Part I

Here in Romania, we had a very soft and warm autumn and winter as well. This tented me to try and collect as much material as I was able, hence starting from November 2017 till April 2018 I took advantage of the warm weekends and went out there scouting and collecting new trees. This way, I have reached a number of over 60 acquisitions some with high potential already, others considered future investments. However, all of them were collected, potted and kept until a few days ago in my basement where the temperatures rarely drop below 7°C. It is a fact that at temperatures between 7°C and 12°C, only the trunk and the branches are dormant. The roots are growing in a slow rate, but still growing. I considered this  an advantage for me, giving the trees a few months to develop new roots in order to start their establishment in the new containers and the new soil, way before they get completely out of their dormancy period. Through this period I was paying attention to not let the soil from the pots dry out completely, still let them dry to the point where oxygen was able to reach the roots. This is important to offer the correct balance of water and oxygen particles around the root system. In doing so, one can make sure that the roots are being treated with proper care and the best survival condition is facilitated as well as their development.

I will not post pictures of all the 60+ trees in this post nor in the following ones, but I will present those that have quite a potential at the moment. However, future posts will slowly cover the entire collection, presenting progression from the collection moment and their development in time. So, this is the first of a series of posts that will probably last for the entire 2018 season, detailing not only the development of the trees, but their after care, handling and fertilization.

A wild Carpinus collected from the top of a rocky hill with a lot of movement and even aerial roots.

A shohin Carpinus, presenting a lot of movement, nice root flare and age.

Semi-raft Carpinus, bent into position using copper wires accomplishing nice movement over its branches.

Wild movement, wild trunk wild aerial roots, this is a wild Carpinus.

Wind blown style Carpinus.

A small shohin Carpinus with an awesome nebari and branch distribution.

Hope you find these trees as full of potential as I do and stay close as more pictures of other ones will come in future posts.

Thanks for the visit!
M.

 

Carpinus pruning – End of season 2017

Carpinus pruning – End of season 2017

As autumn is now already here for some time now, the leaves of my carpinus shohin trees got brown marking the end of this season and telling me that they went dormant till spring. Because I like to take my time when I prune my trees, I start pruning them from autumn gaining also space inside my cold shelter where I house the trees till temperatures are above freezing in spring.

Methodically I started this year with my smallest trees. These were all collected in March 2017. One season growth already established the trees in the pots and also gave me quite impressive elongation of the thin branches.

The tools that I use are classical bonsai pruners such as concave, knob, scissors and classical garden pruning scissors for very thick branches.

The first tree that I pruned is a multiple trunk with a very nice taper. This tree was extremely vigorous this year and it was mandatory to prune it in the summer too, even if this a habit that should be avoided in the first year after collecting from the wild. In the first picture is the tree before pruning and the next ones are after pruning, a front and bird’s eye view.

The real shohin carpinus trees that I have are quite small, they have a height of about 12-15cm and a diameter after pruning of about 20cm.

The next tree is my favorite one. I found it close to a field that often was visited by sheep and I thing its size is given by these continuously eating its new fresh growth year after year.I had to use thick wire to move thick branches into their final position. It was very challenging because carpinus wood is very hard to bent and I ha to put a lot of effort into it. But finally the branches reached their right position.

The last carpinus shogin is the smallest of all. I pruned it back quite hard to try and create dense ramification close to the main trunk. Hope that next year it will bud back on the remaining branches as expected.

 

I apply to all the cut wounds healing and callusing paste by this ensuring that water with diseases will not enter in the cut places and also this will increase the callusing process.